At 8:00 a.m. on the 7th of December 2020, the main line of the Lagos-Ibadan railway, the first double-track standard gauge modern railway in West Africa, commenced trial operations with passengers. On the same day, the acceptance process started on the main line of the railway.

The train departed from the Ibadan station in accordance with the scheduled railway operating plan, the trip lasted 2 hours and 40 minutes, ran 156 kilometres, and arrived at Lagos station at 10:40 a.m. The train departed from Lagos station at 16:00 and arrived at Ibadan station at 18:40, successfully completing the first test run with passengers.

The trial operation was conducted by a China-made Diesel Multiple Unit (DMU), which runs two times a day and opens three stations at the early stage. The train has a standard capacity of 588 passengers, with a limited passenger density of not more than 3/5, in accordance with the Nigerian government’s pandemic prevention and control requirements.

At present, the train runs 2 hours and 40 minutes, and the running time between Lagos and Ibadan will be shortened to 2 hours after the official opening.The project is now being pushed ahead with the construction of the rest of the work, and all the personnel are working around-the-clock with high morale towards its official operation in 2021.

The project started on March 7, 2017 when Vice President Professor Yemi Osinbajo broke ground on the standard gauge #LagosIbadanRail line, on behalf of President @MBuhari. Almost four years, December 7, 2020, the Line commenced commercial operations, ahead of formal commissioning in Q1 2021. This would be the first time in Nigeria history that such project was achieved within four years.

Different reactions from Nigerians who were filled with joy have been trending online.

Tolu Olgunlesi on twitter:

The First passenger showed his ticket which cost him N2,500:

The video of the train as shared on twitter:

Reaction from the Presidency online:

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